Invasive Plants

What is an Invasive Species?

Invasive species are non-native species that can cause harm to the environment, the economy or to human health. Invasives come from all around the world. As international trade increases, so does the rate of invasive species introductions. Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to New York's biodiversity. They cause or contribute to: habitat degradation and loss; the loss of native fish, wildlife and tree species; the loss of recreational opportunities and income; and crop damage and diseases in humans and livestock ( from the New York Dept. of Environmental Conservation).

Common buckthorn2

Common Buckthorn

First imported as a hedging material, Buckthorn out-competes native plants, degrades wildlife habitat, and lacks natural "controls" such as insects or diseases.

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Garlic mustard

Garlic Mustard

Garlic mustard is one of very few non-native plants to be able to successfully invade forest understories.

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Japanese barberry3

Japanese Barberry

An invasive species in New York state that has become a common decorative landscaping plant. Find out more here about how you can identify the plant and what you can do to help.

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Japanese stiltgrass

Japanese Stiltgrass

Thought to have been introduced as packing material in crates from China, Japanese stiltgrass can grow in a variety of habitats.

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Oriental bittersweet2

Oriental Bittersweet

Introduced in the 1860s as an ornamental and for erosion control, Oriental Bittersweet is a vine that smothers plants and uproots trees due to its weight.

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Tree of heaven2

Tree of Heaven

Also known as China sumac or varnishtree, the invasive Tree-of-Heaven can damage and foundations in urban areas.

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Contact

Dayna Valenti-Gaeta
Community Horticulture Program Coordinator
dlv45@cornell.edu
(845) 292-6180 Ext. 112

Last updated December 9, 2015